biologylair:

Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells responsible for synthesizing the extracellular matrix, which is essential in regulating intercellular communication. These cells synthesize collagen and elastin, essential proteins that provide tissues with structural support and elasticity, respectively.
The terms “fibroblast” and “fibrocyte” refer to the same type of cell, the former (suffix -blast) referring to the metabolically activated state. Fibroblasts function in wound healing by reconstructing the extracellular matrices in new tissue formation.
Sources:
Fluorescent-dyed deer skin fibroblast cells
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibroblast

biologylair:

Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells responsible for synthesizing the extracellular matrix, which is essential in regulating intercellular communication. These cells synthesize collagen and elastin, essential proteins that provide tissues with structural support and elasticity, respectively.

The terms “fibroblast” and “fibrocyte” refer to the same type of cell, the former (suffix -blast) referring to the metabolically activated state. Fibroblasts function in wound healing by reconstructing the extracellular matrices in new tissue formation.

Sources:

Fluorescent-dyed deer skin fibroblast cells

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibroblast

scinerds:

Unwelcome Visitor
Credit: CDC/ Dr. Stan Erlandsen
If this fellow is in your well water, don’t quench your thirst. This is a scanning electron microscope image of Giardia muris, a protozoan parasite that causes nasty diarrhea when it infects the intestines of its hosts. Giardia has two phases in its life cycle: the cyst, a dormant phase, and the active trophozoite phase, seen here. People can contract the parasite by drinking water contaminated with cysts; from there, the parasite becomes active, with very unpleasant digestive results. Anti-parasite medication can help fight off these fierce freeloaders, which attach to the intestine lining (seen here in blue). The worm-like flagella seen in this image allow the trophozoites to swim freely in the host’s gut.

scinerds:

Unwelcome Visitor

Credit: CDC/ Dr. Stan Erlandsen

If this fellow is in your well water, don’t quench your thirst. This is a scanning electron microscope image of Giardia muris, a protozoan parasite that causes nasty diarrhea when it infects the intestines of its hosts. 

Giardia has two phases in its life cycle: the cyst, a dormant phase, and the active trophozoite phase, seen here. People can contract the parasite by drinking water contaminated with cysts; from there, the parasite becomes active, with very unpleasant digestive results. Anti-parasite medication can help fight off these fierce freeloaders, which attach to the intestine lining (seen here in blue). The worm-like flagella seen in this image allow the trophozoites to swim freely in the host’s gut.

(via m0rtality)